Results tagged ‘ baseball ’

Around the MLB.com Blogs

These are the most recent posts around the MLB.com Blogs community:

Braves ChopTalk
Braves fan Bob McVinua is thanking his lucky stars for Kris Medlen right now

sfgiantsgirl55
Just one Giants’ fan’s opinion, all the time

Gonzo and ‘The Show’
Whether you’re looking for the latest on Mike Trout or community events, it’s required reading for Angels fans as part of Alden Gonzalez’s regular coverage at angels.com

Dyna Mets
“Bleeding Orange & Blue Since ’82”

The Dash Board
Coverage of the Winston-Salem Dash (High-A, White Sox) by broadcasters Brian Boesch and Mike Lefko

NATSVILLE, USA
Strasberg just dominated the Mets and this blog keeps the coverage coming into the pennant races

Better Off Red
The Reds are red-hot right now, and so is Jamie Ramsey’s blog. He’s the club’s asst. director of media relations

#Ballhawking
Robbie is one of our many baseball-snaggers in the MLB.com Blogs community – we’ve got the most and the originals

Phillies Red Pinstripes
Get a perspective on Cole Hamels’ signing from a blogger now into fifth season in this community

MLB.com Fantasy 411
One of the original MLB.com Blogs since 2005, this is the home of Mike Siano & Cory Schwartz – last word in fantasy

Beck’s Blog
The overall No. 1 MLB.com Blog in popularity for the first half of this season according to Latest Leaders

Curly W Live
Like their team, these guys are really good. From the front office of the Washington Nationals

‘Topes Tattler
We like the regular “Touching Base” feature to go along with the daily Game Notes for the Dodgers’ AAA club

A Twinternal Perspective
What’s it like being an intern at Target Field? They tell you all about it

Beisbol 007
One of our best Spanish-language blogs

More Splash Hits
They want the Melk Man to be re-signed

Muskat Ramblings
All the latest on Ryan Dempster from MLB.com veteran Cubs beat reporter Carrie Muskat

Prospect Productions
This fan site launched in May and relays the latest prospect news – in case Mayo is not enough

Marlins Park
Now that the Marlins new ballpark is well into Year 1, the club still uses this for news

2 Birds 1 Bat
Reaction to Brian Fuentes’ arrival from “A Blog For The Best Fans In Baseball”

Baseball Nerd
Keith Olbermann writes about the state of Florida baseball

SF Giants Photos
The best photography inside AT&T Park

Three Up, Three Down
Ever had steak tips outside Fenway? This blog tells you what it’s like

Bombers Beat
MLB.com Yankees beat reporter Bryan Hoch has the latest on Ichiro’s sendoff in Seattle

Born on Third
We mentioned Carrie’s Cubs blog above, and here’s a good one from a Cubs fan

Grab Some Bench!
Posted by different authors for the serious White Sox fan

It’s All Relative
Ray Charles music, Lynyrd Skynyrd video with lyrics, and lots of Fort Wayne TinCaps talk from the booth

From the Corner of Edgar & Dave
Check out the cool comparison of #34 Mariner jerseys. We’re still getting used to no Ichiro

Dodgers Insider
Lots to say about welcoming Hanley to Tinseltown

On the Mike with Mike Safford
Great inside look at Minor League life from the voice of the Boise Hawks – future Cubs

AROUND THE HORN

Welcome to SABR prez and Diamond Dollar$ author Vince Gennaro, and welcome back to our longtime friend Curt Smith, the foremost authority on baseball broadcasters and author of many books plus the Voices of the Game blog. . . . Hope you have said hello to Camille Campins Adams, wife of Yankees prospect David Adams and author of a good baseball-wife blog. . . . Giants outfielder Gregor Blanco just posted about his dad . . . Mitch Williams blogs about the Phillies’ chances of getting into the postseason despite the miserable first half. And the way the Phillies are suddenly playing, you might want to listen . . . Want to be in this space? Leave a comment with your full URL so we can help other bloggers find you.

Around MLB.com Blogs

Please take the time to read “My Baseball story” by Matt at The Cardinals’ Base, and share your own favorite Major League Baseball memory in the comments there and on your own MLB.com Blog. After all, that’s why we are all blogging here and ready for another great MLB season.

[updated] As of 5:22 pm ET, Plushdamentals was third overall in page views at MLB.com for Feb. 24, as people are buzzing over 16-year-old Brewers blogger Curt Hogg, who broke news. No. 1 is MLB.com Braves beat reporter Mark Bowman and No. 2 is From the Corner of Edgar & Dave.

We’ll have the next monthly MLB.com Blogs Latest Leaders up next week, so never too late to make sure you are doing all the right things to promote your own blog. Be sure to comment on as many other MLB.com Blogs as you can and always leave your full URL wherever you go. Will Plushdamentals have enough time to rise to the top of the Fan category?

Who’s going to be at Spring Training and who’s going to be blogging about it? Let us know here so we can keep an eye out for new posts and hopefully help with some promotion. I’ll be in Arizona next week with the MLB Fan Cave panel and 30 finalists so holla.

Speaking of Fan Cave, in case you missed it, our friend Erik at Counting Baseballs took the time to critique all 50 of the Fan Cave finalist videos when that voting began. He came up with his own top 10, so you can crosscheck and see whether they advanced.

Jim Kaat’s first Spring Training with the Washington Senators was in the 1950s. We’re happy to say that Kitty Kaat is going strong and this week posted a new entry about 2012 Spring Training – where he is helping the Red Sox pitching coach at Fort Myers. Please leave Jim some comments.

Check out the WordPress.com Photo Carousel to easily jazz up your pictures and create slideshows. Like this one…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Calling fans of the defending World Champs: Got a question? Leave it on Jen Langosch’s blog By Gosh, It’s Langosch, because in addition to all of her coverage on cardinals.com, she is doing a Question of the Day on her blog from Cardinals camp. Question, Jen – how do you find time to do such a great job on your MLB.com Blog?

Welcome back to Redsox Nation and Pittsburgh Peas – keep it going!

With all due respect to those other games, The World Will Be Watching THIS on March 23. And I even read all three books.

Why do you blog? Tell us.

Make sure you use the social media widgets in the WordPress.com dashboard and use Twitter and Facebook to support your latest MLB.com Blogs posts. You should create your own Facebook Page to match your blog and encourage others to Like your FB page. Those are no-brainers for promo and we make it very easy to incorporate all that here.

A good example is the author of gojays. And a nice job using polls as well.

Keep leaving comments here with your blog’s full URL so we can help people find you. Happy Spring Training.

Happy Social Media Day 2011

Social Media Day 2011Social Media Day 2011 is a big official-unofficial deal around the world, and Major League Baseball is all over it. Go here for all the details on how to get involved and win cool stuff. And take a look at how 30 Major Leaguers are embracing social media today.

How are you celebrating Social Media Day?

In other news:

  • VOTE, VOTE, VOTE! The 2011 All-Star Game MLB.com Ballot Sponsored by Sprint closes at 11:59 p.m. ET Thursday. Then watch the Selection Show at noon ET Sunday on TBS, and at that point you’ll be able to dive into the Final Vote.
  • The new Latest Leaders for June will be out shortly. Good luck!

    Why we blog about baseball

    I was reading Andrew Sullivan’s post headlined “Why I Blog” and every now and then I guess it is good to ask yourself that. I am curious why you blog, especially why you blog about baseball. We launched MLBlogs in April 2005 with Tommy Lasorda’s debut post about his friend Jackie Robinson, and that’s how this area was born. (Thank you, Tommy — you are the true MLBlogs pioneer!) This past Opening Day, we made it a FREE community, and we had more than four times as many MLBlogs created this season than in the history of MLBlogs. There are a lot of people here who you don’t know, hopefully better ways to find them next season, and for now one great way is to leave a comment here telling us why you blog about baseball. If you want, post it as a blog entry and just link to it — or leave it as a comment with your full URL. Here is why I blog about baseball:

    Because we needed a community blog.

    I have so many blogs and user profiles it is ridiculous, but such is life. I have Shelfari for my love of reading books, I have Blogger for my marathon training (16 days to NYC Marathon!), I have Facebook for family/friends and LinkedIn for professional networking, I have MySpace because I think you have to coexist within a big part of society to know what’s up and be tuned in, I have Flickr and Shutterfly and Photobucket and more for pics, I have multiple YouTube accounts for videos such as my trip to Beijing to work the Olympics, I have lots more that I can’t even remember until they send me an annoying email reminder. I was on Match until I found Miss Right, and I was out in record time. I have a FloTrackr account for running also, and MapMyRun, Runners World. I have Playlist.com to keep my own tunes current for other profiles like MySpace. Tagged was the spam scumbag capital. At least once a day someone asks me to join something…there are many more.

    Now I also have a new MLB.com profile. Have you created yours yet? If not, then what are you waiting for? It’s part of your MLB.com registration. Add me as a friend. I’m mlbmark. In the coming year it will be loaded with more and more social networking components so all MLB.com users can communicate easily with each other — assuming someone wants to be reachable. There’s also our brand-new MLB.com Fanbook app — the official Facebook app of Major League Baseball. Check it out. You probably need more profiles.  🙂

    I’m glad that this is your BASEBALL blog. So why DO you blog about baseball?

    Four words is all you get

    Awards season will be upon us before you know it, and I already have one to give out.

    The MVP — Most Valuable Post.

    I know it because I just saw it.

    http://metrobaseball.mlblogs.com/archives/2008/09/metros_first_entry.html

    It is only four words long. But they are four perfect words.

    WE — a word that says community, plurality, common interest, sellout crowds, loud noise, 80 million fans, widespread contention for races, and thousands of MLBlogs.

    REALLY — completely unnecessary, but when added for effect in this sentence it tells you that even more emphasis is needed for what’s inside.

    LOVE — the verb of our pastime, even moreso than “play.”

    BASEBALL — not just the sport we love, but a bold and beautiful word said with meaning.

    This is why we are all here, and a new MLBlog has said it as succinctly and appropriately as it can possibly be said. Thanks.

    If you only had four words for a post right now, to express your own baseball opinion and passion, what would they be? Comment below — you only get four words.

    Mark/MLB.com

    Join the MLBlogs Facebook Page

    First of all, welcome to all the new MLBlogs created while I was out of the country. We’ll start with Hot Air From a Born Again Giants Fan, aka The Shrimps.

    Hey, crew, we just started an MLBlogs Facebook Page and you are invited to join it as fans. Have fun with it, and use it as another way to alert other baseball fans about a post you just saved. Just remember to include your full URL anytime you post something. Spread the word!

    IMG_8344.JPGSo, I am back from Beijing. It was incredible. Climbed the Great Wall, went to Forbidden City, laughed at the Giant Pandas at the Beijing Zoo (I love how they grab a branch of bamboo and then roll onto their backs and eat it like little kings), turned the dog meat page really fast on a restaurant menu, bartered for a suit at the Silk Market, couldn’t believe what I was seeing at Opening or Closing Ceremony, and in between just soaked up a great Olympiad including an awesome baseball competition that proved the sport belongs in the Games. If you go to my Beijing Memories article, you can find my Olympic Scrapbook on the top of the page.

    Here are some extra baseball pics.

    Some of the two-dozen Major League prospects I got to know quite well. It will be fun to watch their progress now. Also, I was standing next to pitcher Shairon Martis and infielder Yurendell de Caster of the Netherlands in line at Customs (we were surrounded by Russian Olympians), and Shairon told me both of them were on their way to Louisville to rejoin their Columbus Clippers Triple-A team and that he expects both of them to be with the Washington Nationals on Sept. 1. I recognized them by their big, bright orange luggage. A bunch of these guys will be up, too. I think Terry Tiffee needs to be playing first for the Dodgers fast. What a glove and bat.

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    See the guys in the middle in navy blazers in the picture below? It was the bronze medal game between USA and Japan, behind home plate for dignitaries/Olympic Family, and the one second from right is IOC president Jacques Rogge. This was the day I broke the news story that Rogge is mandating Major Leaguers be used if the sport is to be considered for 2016, and that there is “no heirarchy” among the seven contending sports (two will be chosen). No one previously had known specific reasons why it was removed and whether MLB players were good to have or a requirement. Knowing Rogge’s PR person was a gatekeeper and that there would be no prayer of her facilitating an interview with all the media there, I climbed through the tape, climbed over the CEO of Mizuno and whoever else was in my way and sat next to Harvey Schiller (the one of those three on the right) in that empty seat next to him, he shook his head indicating not now, I went back to my seat, and 10 minutes later a volunteer came over to me and said, “Dr. Schiller wants to see you.” He then introduced me to Rogge, and I proceeded to ask eight questions, starting with: “Eighty million fans want to know why you removed baseball from the Olympics and whether it will be back.” He left after a couple of innings, talking to no media as I expected.There’s my Journalism 101 reporting tip for baseball bloggers for the day. Be persistent.

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    Being around the Cuba guys was like being around the Yankees. The exact equivalent. They are rock stars. They have this aura. Below is Pedro Luis Lazo’s fourth Olympic medal, this one silver. He is such a friendly guy. And a competitor, as you could see from Nixie’s left eye. I will always remember the scene after Cuba dusted the U.S. team the last Friday night to deny the Americans a shot at gold. The bus was pulled up next to the Cuba clubhouse, and it sat there for a long time, and the side luggage compartments were opened and Cuba players were sitting in them, their own makeshift party, some drinking beers, socializing with a handful of females who wore Canada Olympic attire. People just wanted to be around them.  Anyway…take a good look at the word “BASEBALL” on this medal. You won’t see it again for at least eight years.

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    I have to give a special shout-out to my friend and YOUR friend, Murray Cook. He is the person responsible for the Wukesong Miracle, the creation of three Major League-caliber ball fields in a place where no one really knew what baseball was. Murray is one of the original MLBloggers, and it was my first chance to meet him in person. He created his blog on the same day that Tommy created his — April 2005. Murray, thanks for always being able to lend a hand to another Western visitor and introducing me to Yang Yang’s dad, the groundskeeping father of the China backup catcher who stole the show one night.

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    And then there was one of the most likable bunch of guys you could be around. The Korean team was a perfect 9-0. Nine, the perfect baseball number. Their manager was just someone you looked forward to talking to, even through a translator. Ryu (99), their big
    pitcher who almost went the distance in the finale, was a big teddy bear afterwards and he bit his gold medal after obliging my request to check it out. It meant the world to them. It meant the world to baseball. You could see how strong baseball is around the globe, growing stronger every year. The U.S. now knows it will have to field a SERIOUS team for the next World Baseball Classic. You could take either of this summer’s All-Star teams and would not win the next World Baseball Classic unless it has a togetherness and total commitment. One other thing I really noticed at the Olympics was that it was an aberration to see a 90-mph readout for non-USA pitchers. You face heat only as a “changeup”, really. I saw mostly high 70s, lots in the 80s, and many different release points, sidearmers, three-quarters, so much off-balance stuff. That had to be tough on the U.S. guys, who typically look at 90s all the time. Now they go back and will see 90s all the time. International ball is definitely an adjustment. Congrats to Korea.

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    It was a beautiful experience. The hardest part was trying to do my daily MLB.com Olympic show, where I would call into our studios and you would get my voice and picture of me in my peasant hat along with other imagery. I was always 12 hours ahead of New York time, and when there were night games over there, filled with drama and then deadline writing, it was not exactly easy to find a time to break away and talk on the phone with the U.S.! You also should check out Brian Duensing’s final blog post; he played a role in bringing home a bronze, after a touching scene in which the Twins helped raise funds so that his wife could fly there and be with their Triple-A pitcher.

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    OK, your turn to post summertime pics. And make sure you join that MLBlogs Facebook Page!

    I was just curious what happens when you do a tag search on the MLBlogs homepage for the word “baseball.” Here you go. You’ll find lots of cool MLBlogs that you probably didn’t know about. Check ’em out! Also have to give a shout-out to Cub Fans, which continues to hold the MLBlogs record for most comments on a blog with just a handful of words posted. Great example of someone who knows how to get his own circle of influence to check out the blog. Just makes it happen.

    Ni Hao from Beijing

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    Hello, MLBloggers! Am over here at the Summer Olympics and back at the end of August, so hold down the fort while I’m away. Got here a couple of days before Opening Ceremony, am with the USA Baseball Team the whole way. So Wukesong Stadium is pretty much my office. What you notice most are the volunteers — about 100,000 kids mainly college-age, wearing the familiar uniforms with blue “Beijing 2000” tech shirts, khakis and yellow-striped running shoes. They are everywhere. My “Taxi Cards” are a lifeline — just show what you want/where you want to go, and each has Chinese lettering symbols on the card as well as my phonetic pronunciation. Gradually learning some Mandarin that I will forget in a few weeks, and yesterday spoke the universal language when I went on a 2-hour training run along Badaling Expressway and stopped 1:30 into the run to watch 5-on-5 hoops (basketball is huge here thanks to Yao) at a park. A man asked me if I want to play (he didn’t really ask, he gestured), and I said by all means I would love to with all my heart (I didn’t really speak, I gestured). They were great games and at the end I did a Cal Ripken lap around shaking every man’s hand. In that moment everything was perfect in the world, and we all spoke the same and believed in sports. You can find my coverage around the clock at MLB.com, as our “Baseball at the Olympics” writer over here. Keep the blogging going strong, and pardon the interruption in watching it all happen but I’m following a quest for the gold and seeing the sights. Remember to leave lots of comments here with your URL as another way for people to find your blog. I am looking forward to seeing the Men’s Marathon on the final day, I am still looking forward to a scrumptious Peking Duck, I still have to see the Great Wall and compare it to the Green Monster, and the two things that have struck me most are (a) how much BS the overblown hype about air pollution was as I am marathon training just fine in it, and (b) they actually grew ivy outside the building structure of Wukesong Field 2 because our friend Murray Cook told them about Wrigley ivy. By the way, get to know Murray — he’s one of our four original MLBloggers circa April 2005, and he is the person who created the baseball experience here in Beijing, turning a parking lot into Major League caliber ball fields and teaching people who didn’t know what “base” meant how to groundskeep. My BlackBerry has smoke coming out of it because of the constant updates from MLB clubs about their latest announcements as well as every USOC event update from Michael Phelps to pistol to rowing…and I am loving it. As they say here: “Bye-Bye” (I had a hard time learning that one).

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