Results tagged ‘ baseball history ’

Introducing #AskTheHistorian

thorn-askthehistorianJohn Thorn, Official Historian for Major League Baseball and veteran MLB PRO Blogger, has been answering quite a few historical questions from fans on Twitter of late. For the responses requiring more than 140 characters, John has introduced a new feature to his popular blog that is required reading for all baseball fans. It’s called #AskTheHistorian and encourages fans to submit their questions that they’d like to see him address. So fire away with your toughest historical queries, and if you’re not already following Our Game, make sure to click the “Sign me up!” button on the right side of his blog to sign up for email notifications of new posts.

John Thorn’s “Our Game” MLBlog features 16 essays

Major League Baseball Official Historian John Thorn is featuring 16 essays, which are included in the Special Origins Issue of the journal “Base Ball,” on the Our Game MLBlog right here.

Our Game, which launched in April, discusses the aims and efforts of the “Baseball Origins Committee,” while also embracing recent events of Baseball’s history. Please feel free to say hello there and join his commenters.

In March, Commissioner Bud Selig appointed Thorn to lead various research endeavors and special projects on behalf of MLB. In his first official task in this role, Thorn has been assigned to lead the “Baseball Origins Committee” to determine the facts of baseball’s beginnings and its evolution.

In the first of 16 articles, researcher and author David Block, a member of the “Baseball Origins Committee,” investigates one of baseball’s earliest periods in his article Polish Workers Play Ball at Jamestown, Va. Within the piece, Block discusses the origins of the game beginning, incredibly, in 1609, with a group of Polish craftsmen engaging in a bat and ball game, known as pilka palantowa, in front of a crowd of Native Americans. He explores the growth of “long ball” throughout history and searches to find the source of modern day American baseball.

In the coming weeks and months, Thorn’s MLBlog will continue to tell the story of how the game of baseball first emerged in America and how it became the American institution it is today through 15 additional essays by distinguished scholars.

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